Mal J Nutr 22(1): 81 - 90, 2016

Prevalence of Obesity as Determined by Different Anthropometric Indices Among Rural Adolescents in Aba South LGA, Abia State, Nigeria
Paul Eze Eme, Nnenna Ola Onuoha & B 0 Mbah

Department of Home Science, Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Adolescent obesity is a growing public health problem worldwide. This study assessed the prevalence of obesity in a sample of Nigerian rural adolescents using different anthropometric indices. Methods: A total of 600 secondary school adolescents aged 10 to 19 years were selected from ten secondary schools in the Aba South Local Government Area (WA) using a multi-stage random sampling technique. Weight, height, arm circumference, and skinfold measurements were obtained using standard methods. Body fat percentage was calculated according to the Slaughter and Shaikh equations. Descriptive statistics were used to examine gender-specific anthropometric indices. Chi-square and independent t-test were applied to determine differences between the sexes. Results: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the subjects was 9.7% and 3.5%, respectively. There was a significant difference between males and females for waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, waist-height ratio and body fat percentage. Females had more fat deposits in all the skinfold sites measured than males regardless of age group. Females also had significantly higher body fat than males. Multiple regression analysis revealed that calf fat was a strong predictor of body fat percentage in the subjects. Conclusion: More than 10% of the rural Nigerian adolescents studied were overweight, with the females showing significantly higher body fat than the males according to the criteria used. Further studies are recommended to identify contributing factors for the results obtained.

Adolescents, fat deposit, health, Nigeria, skinfold sites

Download full article

March 1995, Vol1 No.1
September 1995, Vol1 No.2
March 1996, Vol2 No.1
September 1996, Vol2 No.2
March 1997, Vol3 No.1
September 1997, Vol3 No.2
December 1998, Vol4 No.1&2
December 1999, Vol5 No.1&2
March 2000, Vol6 No.1
September 2000, Vol6 No.2
Mar/Sept 2001, Vol7 No.1&2
March 2002, Vol8, No.1
September 2002, Vol8, No.2
March 2003, Vol9 No.1
September 2003, Vol9 No.2
March 2004, Vol10 No.1
September 2004, Vol10 No. 2
2005, Vol 11 No.1
2005, Vo l11 No.2
2006, Vol 12 No.1
2006, Vol 12 No.2
2007, Vol 13 No.1
2007, Vol 13 No.2
March 2008, Vol 14 No.1
2008, Vol 14 No.2
2009, Vol 15 No.1
2009, Vol 15 No.2
2010, Vol 16(1)

2010, Vol 16(2)

2010, Vol 16(3)

2011, Vol 17(1)

2011, Vol 17(2)

2011, Vol 17(3)

2012, Vol 18(1)

2012, Vol 18(2)

2012, Vol 18(3)

2013, Vol 19(1)

2013, Vol 19(2)

2013, Vol 19(3)

2014, Vol 20(1)

2014, Vol 20(2)

2014, Vol 20(3)

2015, Vol 21(1)

2015, Vol 21(2)

2015, Vol 21(3)

2016, Vol 22(1)

2016, Vol 22(2)

2016, Vol 22 Supplement

2016, Vol 22(3)

2017, Vol 23(1)

2017, Vol 23(2)