Mal J Nutr 22(1): 113 - 123, 2016

Household Nutrition and Food Security in Obukpa Rural Community of Enugu State, Nigeria
Ogechi Nzeagwu & Uche Aleke

Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Umuahia Abia State, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Food and nutrition security remains a fundamental challenge for human welfare, economic growth, and a healthy life. This study investigated household nutrition and food security in a rural conununity of the Nsukka Local Government Area (LGA) of Enugu State, Nigeria. Methods: The Obukpa rural community was randomly selected from among three rural communities in the Nsukka LGA. Convenience sampling was used to select 263 respondents. A structured validated questionnaire was used to elicit household background information. Nutrition security was determined based on anthropometric indicators. Food security was assessed using the Food Security Survey Module (FSSM). Data were analysed using SPSS version 18. Results: About 43.1% practised subsistence farming, 26.9% depended on borrowing food items to cope with nutritional and food security challenges. Few (6.5%) were food secure, 52.7% food insecure without hunger, 30.4% food secure with moderate hunger, and 10.4 % food insecure with severe hunger. In terms of women's weight, 41.2% of the them had normal weight, 39.6% were overweight and 18.5% were obese. Among the children, there was a high prevalence of wasting (52.2%) stunting (45.9 %), underweight (55%) and overweight (48.3%) Nutrition and food insecurity significantly correlated with middle upper arm circumference (MUAC) (0.634, p<0.01), weight for age (0.933, p<0.01), height for age (0.939, p<0.01), BMI for age (0.804, p<0.01), weight for 1/h (0.784, p<0.01) for children under 5 years. Conclusion: In the Obukpa rural community, the level of household food insecurity was high, the majority of the children were wasted, stunted, underweight or overweight. Appropriate nutrition interventions are needed to address the high prevalence of malnutrition of mothers and children.

Community, food security, household, nutrition, rural

Download full article

March 1995, Vol1 No.1
September 1995, Vol1 No.2
March 1996, Vol2 No.1
September 1996, Vol2 No.2
March 1997, Vol3 No.1
September 1997, Vol3 No.2
December 1998, Vol4 No.1&2
December 1999, Vol5 No.1&2
March 2000, Vol6 No.1
September 2000, Vol6 No.2
Mar/Sept 2001, Vol7 No.1&2
March 2002, Vol8, No.1
September 2002, Vol8, No.2
March 2003, Vol9 No.1
September 2003, Vol9 No.2
March 2004, Vol10 No.1
September 2004, Vol10 No. 2
2005, Vol 11 No.1
2005, Vo l11 No.2
2006, Vol 12 No.1
2006, Vol 12 No.2
2007, Vol 13 No.1
2007, Vol 13 No.2
March 2008, Vol 14 No.1
2008, Vol 14 No.2
2009, Vol 15 No.1
2009, Vol 15 No.2
2010, Vol 16(1)

2010, Vol 16(2)

2010, Vol 16(3)

2011, Vol 17(1)

2011, Vol 17(2)

2011, Vol 17(3)

2012, Vol 18(1)

2012, Vol 18(2)

2012, Vol 18(3)

2013, Vol 19(1)

2013, Vol 19(2)

2013, Vol 19(3)

2014, Vol 20(1)

2014, Vol 20(2)

2014, Vol 20(3)

2015, Vol 21(1)

2015, Vol 21(2)

2015, Vol 21(3)

2016, Vol 22(1)

2016, Vol 22(2)

2016, Vol 22 Supplement

2016, Vol 22(3)

2017, Vol 23(1)

2017, Vol 23(2)