Mal J Nutr 21(3): 299 - 307, 2015

Breakfast Eating Habits and Nutritional Status of Primary School Children in Orumba South Local Government Area of Anambra State, Nigeria
Ukegbu Patricia Ogechi

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study was carried out to describe breakfast eating habits and nutritional status of primary school children in rural areas of Anambra state, Nigeria.
Methods: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey involving 358 primary school children (aged 6-11 years) randomly selected from 5 private primary schools in Anambra state. A pre-tested questionnaire on dietary habits, breakfast eating habits and content of breakfasts was used to collect data. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Chi square.
Results: The mean age of the children was 8.2±0.7years. The percentage of children who reported taking breakfast on the day of the study was 77.7%, while 71.2% ate breakfast 25 times per week. Those who skipped breakfast cited waking up late (48.8%) and lack of enough food at home (43.8%) as reasons for skipping breakfast. Breakfast was usually consumed at home by 90.6% of the children. Foods in the bread/cereal group (61.5%) and tea/cocoa beverages (59.7%) were commonly consumed for breakfast. The snacks brought to school were mainly pastry products (78.8%). The prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting among the children were 15.9%, 27.4% and 20.7%, respectively. Those who consumed breakfast more than 5 times a week were more likely to have better weight-for-age status than their counterparts (X2=6.690;p=0.043) (P<0.05).
Conclusion: Most of the children were reportedly used to having daily breakfast. However, there is a need to assess the nutritional quality and adequacy of breakfasts consumed by young children

Keywords: Anthropometry, breakfast habits, nutritional status, school children

Download full article

March 1995, Vol1 No.1
September 1995, Vol1 No.2
March 1996, Vol2 No.1
September 1996, Vol2 No.2
March 1997, Vol3 No.1
September 1997, Vol3 No.2
December 1998, Vol4 No.1&2
December 1999, Vol5 No.1&2
March 2000, Vol6 No.1
September 2000, Vol6 No.2
Mar/Sept 2001, Vol7 No.1&2
March 2002, Vol8, No.1
September 2002, Vol8, No.2
March 2003, Vol9 No.1
September 2003, Vol9 No.2
March 2004, Vol10 No.1
September 2004, Vol10 No. 2
2005, Vol 11 No.1
2005, Vo l11 No.2
2006, Vol 12 No.1
2006, Vol 12 No.2
2007, Vol 13 No.1
2007, Vol 13 No.2
March 2008, Vol 14 No.1
2008, Vol 14 No.2
2009, Vol 15 No.1
2009, Vol 15 No.2
2010, Vol 16(1)

2010, Vol 16(2)

2010, Vol 16(3)

2011, Vol 17(1)

2011, Vol 17(2)

2011, Vol 17(3)

2012, Vol 18(1)

2012, Vol 18(2)

2012, Vol 18(3)

2013, Vol 19(1)

2013, Vol 19(2)

2013, Vol 19(3)

2014, Vol 20(1)

2014, Vol 20(2)

2014, Vol 20(3)

2015, Vol 21(1)

2015, Vol 21(2)

2015, Vol 21(3)

2016, Vol 22(1)

2016, Vol 22(2)

2016, Vol 22 Supplement

2016, Vol 22(3)

2017, Vol 23(1)

2017, Vol 23(2)