Mal J Nutr 20(3): 283 - 289, 2014

Serum Adiponectin Concentrations in Relation to Lipid Proffle, Anthropometric Variables and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome
Mfr-Mousa Mfrmnazhad', Mahdieh Abbasalizad Farhangi*2, Leila Jahangiri3 & Aifreza Yaghoubi'

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Associations between serum adiponectin concentrations and anthropometric and metabolic parameters in obesity and diabetes have been elucidated; however, the relationship between serum adiponectin and cardiovascular risks in patients with metabolic syndrome are less studied.
Methods: One hundred and sixty patients with metabolic syndrome (107 men and 54 women) were recruited for this study. Anthropometric indices of weight, height, waist circumference and hip circumference were measured. Serum adiponectin, lipid profile and fasting blood glucose (FBG) were measured by enzyme- linked irnmunosorbent assay method (ELbA). The homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used for determination of insulin resistance.
Results: BMI was significantly higher and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was lower in women compared to men (P < 0.001 and < 0.05 respectively). Serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in women was significantly higher than in men (45.98 11.15 versus 39.11 8.43 mg/dl; P < 0.001). Serum adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with serum triglyceride concentration and waist cfrcumference in men and women respectively. There was also a positive relationship between serum adiponectin and HDL-C concentrations and age in men and women respectively (P < 0.05). Adjusting for the confounding effects of age and BMI using linear regression model, serum TG, LDL-C and WC were significant negative predictors of serum adiponectin concentrations (P < 0.05).
Conclusion: Our findings showed that serum adiponectin concentration is related to anthropometric and metabolic parameters in patients with metabolic syndrome. Further studies are warranted to better clarify these associations and underlying mechanisms.

Keywords: Adiponectin, BMI, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, WI-JR

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